Awesome Things To Do
In The White Mountains Of Eastern Arizona

Day Tours

DAY TOURS:

Consider making Springerville-Eagar your headquarters for day trips to the Petrified Forest, Big Lake, Luna New Mexico, Volcanic Field Tour, Casa Malpaís National Park, Zuni, Sunrise Ski Resort, or any of our hiking, biking, ATV, or horse trails.


Springerville Volcanic Fields (image)Volcanic Field Tour Day Trip

Areas of a large number of volcanoes are called volcanic fields by geologists and large volcanic fields with hundreds of volcanoes are quite rare and unusual. The Springerville Field contains 405 vents, and covers about 1,158 square miles (that is larger than the state of Rhode Island)! The field extends from just east of Springerville to Show Low and from Greer to just south of St. Johns. The large area covered by this volcanic field is also very unusual. There are very few other places in the world where you can drive at interstate highway speeds for one hour (such as between Springerville and Show Low) and still be in the same volcanic field.


Petrified Forest National Park of Arizona (image)Petrified Forest National Monument

A little more than an hour from the Springerville Heritage Center lies the Petrified Forest, and it is more spectacular than ever. While the park’s wonders haven’t changed much in thousands of years, how you experience this unique environment has. There are backcountry hikes into areas closed to visitors until recently—such as Red Basin and little known areas such as Martha’s Butte. There are also new exhibits to bring the stories to life. Come discover—or rediscover—the Petrified Forest! VISIT THEIR WEBSITE

Winter Recreation

WINTER RECREATION:

All traditional snow sports can be enjoyed right here in Arizona’s winter  wonderland. Cross-country and downhill skiing, snowboarding, snowshoeing, snowcatting, snowmobiling, sledding, ice skating, tubing, ice fishing, and even old fashioned sleigh rides.

Try these popular spots: 


Sunrise Park Resort logo (image)Sunrise Ski Resort

  • Downhill skiing (11 lifts, 65 runs)
  • Cross-country skiing
  • Sledding
  • Snowmobiling,
  • Accommodations and rentals are available

VISIT THEIR WEBSITE


Sledding in Apache County (image)Williams Valley Winter Recreation Area

  • Cross-country skiing
  • Sledding
  • Snowmobiling

VIEW MAP


Apache County Pole Knoll Cross-Country Ski Trail (image)Pole Knoll & Greer Trails

  • Cross-country skiing

VIEW MAP


Hannagan Meadow Lodge logo (image)Hannagan Meadow Winter Recreation Area

  • Cross-country skiing
  • Snowmobiling

VIEW MAP


Squirrel Springs Wilderness Area (image)Squirrel Springs Recreation Area

  • Cross-country skiing
  • Mountain Biking
  • Sledding
  • Wilderness area

VIEW MAP


Rent or buy it - our chamber can help you find it.

Contact THE SWEAT SHOP for your ski, snowboard, and tube rentals. Snow sleds are available at Western Drug and Davis Ace Hardware.

Bird Watching

Birding in the White Mountains of Eastern Arizona:

There is no end to the activities in the White Mountains during the summer months. Hiking, camping, fishing, exploring, and deck-chair lounging are popular—and the list goes on. Now there is something new! The White Mountains are slowly becoming known as a birding destination. The prime season for birding is June through September. June and July are the breeding months and the birds are more vocal and easier to spot. August and September is when you can catch glimpses of migratory birds, as well as local varieties.

 

Expert birders were kind enough to share with us some of the species and their locations. On this page are: dusky grouse, pinyon jays, Lewis’s woodpecker, American three-toed woodpecker, gray jay, Clarks nutcrackers, and American dippers, to name a few.

For Grouse, look in knolls such as Green’s Peak and Big Lake Lookout; all around Nutrioso for Lewis’s woodpecker, and the west fork of the Little Colorado in Greer is a good place to find Dippers. The south fork, Sunrise Lake and campground, Grasslands Wildlife Area, Becker Lake, Luna Lake in Alpine, Terry Flats on Escudilla Mountain, Sipes Wildlife Area, and Wenema Riparian Area have other species and are within easy driving distance of Springerville-Eagar.

Casa Malpais Archaeological Park & Museum

Casa Malpais Archaeological Park & Museum:

Situated beneath the rim of a shield volcano that erupted more than 800,000 years ago, Casa Malpaís is one of the latest occupied pueblos of its time period. Built on volcanic fissures on a terraced site overlooking the Little Colorado River near Springerville, Arizona, this pueblo features a rock calendar, a Great Kiva, and a large masonry pueblo, built out of basalt cobbles. It is commonly thought to be a regional trading center, as well as a regional ceremonial center, inhabited for approximately 100 years around the time period of 1250 to 1340 CE. By the time Coronado came through the area looking for the famed cities of Cibola in 1540, there were no permanent residents in the area.

Starting with the first white man to visit the site, Frank Hamilton Cushing, in 1883, the site has held the interest of the archaeological community ever since. Brought here by the Zuni in New Mexico, Cushing was the first to diagram the pueblo site, and nicknamed it Fissure Pueblo. Followed by several more expeditions, and finally a concerted effort by archaeological organizations, the town of Springerville, the Hopi tribe, and the Pueblo of Zuni to thoroughly document excavation and preservation of sites, Casa Malpaís continues today to be a source of learning about this pre-historic time period in the Round Valley area.

Today, Casa Malpaís remains a destination for travelers interested in archaeological sites and history. In 1964, the site was made a National Historic Monument. Prehistoric sites are numerous in the area, and many people plan their trips around these sites. Along with the museum filled with artifacts from the excavation of Casa Malpaís, and a well-produced video giving the history of the site, it has become a popular destination for national as well as international travelers.

Located at the Springerville Heritage Center
418 E. Main Street
Springerville, AZ 85938
928-333-5375

Tours start from the Museum (418 E. Main St.)
March through November, Tuesday – Saturday
Tour times: 9 and 1, weather permitting
Reservations suggested.

VISIT WEBSITE

Pets are not allowed at the cultural site.

Museums

Renee Cushman portrait, Renee Cushman Art Museum (image)Renee Cushman Art Collection

Springerville, a town located in a scenic four-seasons area of eastern Arizona, would seem an unlikely place to find an outstanding collection of European art, but so it is. Visitors will be surprised to discover this museum contains an engraving attributed to Rembrandt, three pen-and-ink drawings by Tiepolo, and dozens of other pieces of art and furniture dating from the Renaissance to the early twentieth century.

This remarkable collection was a gift to the area from Mrs. Renee Scharf Cushman, who had lived in the area for only a few years during and after World War II. Only upon her death in 1969, when she willed this valuable collection to the local Latter-Day Saints congregation, did anyone begin to realize how much she had loved the land and respected the people.

In 2012, after over 40 years of honoring, arranging tours, and caring for this collection, the Springerville and Eagar Third Wards passed the Renee Cushman Art Museum on to the Town of Springerville, to allow a greater exposure to the Collection.

Located within the Springerville Heritage Center
418 E. Main Street, Springerville, AZ

Self-Guided Tours
Open Monday – Saturday
(928) 333-2656, Ext 230

VIEW MAP


Butterfly Lodge Museum (image)Butterfly Lodge Museum

Butterfly Lodge was built in Greer in 1914. Oyis Blackfoot was inspired by the countless butterflies in the nearby meadows. It was the mountain residence and hunting lodge belonging to James Willard Schultz (1859 –1947) and his son, Hart Merriam Schultz, known as Lone Wolf (1882 –1970). The lodge housed two colorful careers: the father’s fashioned in words, the son’s through painted images and sculptures of the west. They were two free spirits who found inspiration in this little cabin in the high mountains of Greer.

Butterfly Lodge was opened to the public as Greer’s first museum in 1995, a living memorial to the life and times of James Willard Schultz and Lone Wolf.

Open:
Memorial Day – Labor Day
Thursday – Sunday, 10am to 5pm
Admission: $2 Adult, $1 Youth (12 – 17), children are free

(928) 735-7514
PO Box 76, Greer, AZ 85925

VISIT THEIR WEBSITE


Casa Malpaís Museum (image)Casa Malpais Archaeological Park & Museum

Located at the Springerville Heritage Center, 418 E. Main, the Casa Malpaís Museum houses many artifacts from the archaeological site located north of town. These artifacts date from around 1200 CE. Tours of the site originate from here Tuesday through Saturday, weather permitting. A well-produced video of the site provides the history, is shown 20 minutes prior tour times, and is available upon request for all.

418 E. Main Street
Springerville, AZ 85938
Museum Open: Monday – Saturday, 8 AM – 4 PM
Tours start from the Museum (418 E. Main St)
March – November, Tuesday – Saturday
Tour times: 9, 11:30, and 2, weather permitting
Reservations suggested: (928) 333-5375

VISIT THEIR WEBSITE


Little House Museum (image)Little House Museum

Take a step back in time. This is a truly unique museum with antiques and artifacts from the old west. Old buildings have been authentically restored to their original condition. Around every corner you’ll see turn-of-the-century vintage fashions.

Located on the X Diamond & MLY Ranch west of Springerville, the two-story Little House Museum features exhibits on ranching and pioneer life.

Three miles south of Route 260 on south Fork Road
Springerville, AZ 85938

(928) 333-2286


White Mountain Historical Park

The WMHS is a non-profit organization who's focus is on preserving the area's rich history. The park includes an incredible collection of original buildings, work tools, personal belongings and artifacts collected from the communities of Alpine, Eagar, Greer, Nutrioso, Springerville and Vernon.

504 Movave St Springerville, AZ 85938

VIEW WEBSITE

Outdoor Recreation

Nature Acivities

  • 40 area lakes and over 600 miles of mountain rivers and streams provide amazing views of a variety of birds, wildlife, and terrain
  • Bird watching—Becker Lake, Canero Lake, Luna Lake, Nelson Reservoir, Mexican Hay Lake, and Greer Lakes are especially good
  • Wilderness Areas—Mount Baldy, Escudilla and Bear Wallow Wilderness, and the Blue Primitive Area plus Sipe Wildlife Area, Becker Wildlife Walk, and Grasslands Wildlife Area
  • Mushrooms, wild grape, berry, and piñon gathering.
  • Wildflowers
  • Stargazing—no city lights!
  • Elk bugling
  • Fall foliage tours
  • USFS Interpretive Tours and Presentations
  • Big Lake Nature Trail
  • Butler Canyon Nature Trail
  • Squirrel Springs Recreation Area, Greer
  • Downhill skiing, snow boarding, tubing, and cross-country skiing in winter at Sunrise Ski Resort
  • Summer activities at Sunrise Ski Park, including zipline and mountain biking.

Water Sports

Lyman Lake is the one area where power boats are permitted. All other lakes are restricted to small motors or electric motors only.

  • Water skiing; public slalom course at Lyman
  • Paddle boats; rentals at several locations
  • Wind surfing
  • Jet skiing
  • Swimming at Lyman Lake
  • Fishing at all lakes
  • Sailing at Lyman and Sunrise Lakes

OHV Trails - Saffell Canyon

CANYON OHV TRAIL includes some of the most-spectacular views in the White Mountains of Arizona. The trail begins at an elevation of 7,600 feet at Saffel Canyon and climbs to 9,400 feet at Pat Knoll. The trail winds through three distinct vegetation zones: piñon-juniper, ponderosa pine, and mixed conifer.

Trail access is 1 mile south of Eagar. From the Eagar stoplight, travel south on Main Street to Schoolbus Road (road takes a 90 degree turn to the west); turn left (south) on Water Canyon Road (FR 285); and follow for 1.8 miles. Turn left (east) on FR 74 for .9 miles; turn right (south) on FR 74D. The trailhead is on the right.

Maps available at the Chamber Office (418 E. Main in Springerville) and at forest service locations in Springerville and Alpine.

VIEW MAP


Camping

The Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest and the White Mountain Apache Reservation offer many beautiful individual and group sites within 10-30 minutes drive of the communities. Opportunities for both tent and rv camping abound throughout the area. Hunters, fishermen, hikers and other outdoor enthusiasts can find camping accommodations to fit any personal preferences.


 

Hiking, Backpacking, and Mountain Biking

The White Mountains of eastern Arizona offer endless hiking opportunities. Whether you're looking for an quick, easy nature trek, a challenging alpine excursion, or just about anything in between you're sure to get your hiking fix in t Trail maps and information are available from the Springerville-Eagar Regional Chamber of Commerce, the ALPINE RANGER STATION and the SPRINGERVILLE RANGER STATION


Fishing

WHERE TO FISH IN ARIZONA

VIEW SUMMER TROUT STOCKING SCHEDULE & FISHING LOCATIONS

Summary Wallow Fire-White Mountains Fishing
Wallow Fire Impacts on Specific Trout Populations
Region 1 Stocking Schedule


Hunting

The area is long famed for its hunting, and notables such as Zane Grey, Teddy Roosevelt who loved to hunt here. The area permits bow, black powder, and rifle hunting, and guides and outfitters are available.

Contact the ARIZONA GAME & FISH DEPT. for hunting seasons and permit information.

Springerville Heritage Center

Dinosaur Exploration Center:

Springerville Heritage Center logo (image)Citizen Science from Arizona’s White Mountains

Ten years in the making, the Springerville Heritage Center offers visitors and community members opportunities to learn about history, art, and the area. This is the place to start your trip, with the visitor’s center where tourist information is readily available.

Four museums from around the communities of Round Valley have been relocated into the historic school building at 418 East Main Street in Springerville:

The Renee Cushman Museum, the Becker Family History Museum, Casa Malpaís, and the White Mountain Historical Society. the Springerville-Eagar Chamber of Commerce has been relocated to the front of the Town of Springerville Complex, and a new art gallery has been added in the expanded space.

Local artists from the Greater Round Valley Fine Arts Association display their work in the 150-ft. main hallway and include works from photographers, oil and watercolor painters, quilters, needle-pointers, and more!

Settling in the area after leaving France, Renee Cushman lived out her dream of becoming a rancher here in the 1940s.

The Becker’s were one of the first families to settle our area, and influenced much of the history politically and as merchants.

418 E Main St
Springerville, Arizona
(928) 333-2656 Ext 230

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The Coronado Trail

The History of the Coronado Trail

The legend of the Seven Cities of Gold (Cibola) existed long before Francisco Vasquez de Coronado. Mapmakers had actually been including their idea of where this area was for several hundred years before the Coronado expedition in 1540. The mystique was enough to excite and challenge explorers to competitively seek out the mystical Seven Cities in the New World.

After Columbus’s voyage in 1492, explorers soon settled in islands around what is now Florida, preparing for their journeys. As it happened, the Mayans and Aztecs of what is now Mexico proved to have great wealth and the Spanish found much to convince them that they were on the right track.

Coronado, funded in part by his family and part by Spain, set out on his journey to claim his riches in 1540 – 1542. It was a journey that would take him into what is now Arizona and New Mexico.

In part, Coronado relied on information from a fellow Spaniard, Fray Marcos, who claimed to have seen for himself the golden cities when he made the trek as far north as the Zuni villages near today’s Arizona-New Mexico border in 1538. With a force of 300 Spaniards and 800 Indians, Coronado traveled northward from Mexico, crossing into Arizona at what is now the town of Lochiel, AZ. It is written he traveled to some ruins in southeast Arizona (no longer in existence), where he turned northward, crossing the Gila River somewhere near Safford, between the modern towns of Duncan and Bylas.

Although we’d like to think Coronado traveled north through Arizona’s White Mountains to what is now Springerville, it may be more likely he followed the road system early native inhabitants of the area had developed, taking him on a parallel, but somewhat easier course to what is now given the name of Coronado Scenic Highway.

It is claimed Coronado’s expedition traveled as far north in Arizona as the town of St Johns, before turning toward their destination of Cibola, or, what is known today as Zuni, New Mexico.

Instead of the great city Fray Marcus had reported, Cibola turned out to be a poor village of not more than 200 inhabitants. As they would be satisfied only with immediate gold and riches, they did not recognize the potential in the fertile valley through which they passed, nor could they see the value deep in the hills—the copper, silver, and gold they so desired. Thus, the expedition was deemed a failure.

Fast forward to 1926, when the US Highway 666 (now Hwy 191), between Springerville and Morenci was completed and designated a National Scenic Byway; one of 30 in the nation. At the dedication, Governor W.P. Hunt referred to the highway as the Coronado Scenic Byway, as it approximated the path taken by Coronado not quite 400 years earlier.

Arizona Coronado Trail map (image)

Wildlife Areas

Sipe White Mountain Wildlife Area

A few miles southeast of Springerville and Eagar on Highway 180/191, in the shadows of Escudilla Mountain, lies Sipe White Mountain Wildlife Area. Recreational opportunities include wildlife viewing and photography, picnicking, and hiking to historic and prehistoric cultural sites. A small visitor center is located on site. Visitors are encouraged to look through the visitor center first and then explore the grounds to enhance their wildlife viewing experience. Move about the property freely by hiking, biking, or horseback riding on one of four trails leading to wetlands, meadows, and old homesteads. Several wildlife viewing points are located along the trails. Visit the last weekend in July for the annual Hummingbird band, High Country Hummers.

VIEW MAP MORE INFO


Becker Lake Springerville Arizona

Becker Lake Wildlife Area

The wildlife area has two hiking trails. The Lakeview Trail is a one-mile loop following the western edge of Becker Lake to an observation platform overlooking the southern, marshy end of the lake. Here, waterfowl and shorebirds can easily be seen, especially during migration. The River Walk Trail meanders along the Little Colorado River for a half-mile where mule deer and beaver are readily found. Lakeview Trail access is two miles west of the traffic light in Springerville on Highway 60. Turn south into the main Becker Lake area, designated with signage. The River Walk Trail is one mile west of the light in Springerville on Highway 60. Turn south into the parking area just before crossing the bridge over the Little Colorado River.

In December, the River Walk is turned into the Festival of Lights, decorated with more than 30,000 lights for the holidays.

VIEW MAP MORE INFO


Weinema Wildlife Area

This corridor of river riparian habitat stretches more than two miles along the Little Colorado River. Two hiking trails provide easy access to both stream-side and upland areas where you can view beaver, mule deer, chipmunks, numerous waterfowl, birds, and raptors. At the junction of US Hwys 60 and 191/180, go a quarter mile north on Hwy 191/180 and turn right onto a graded, dirt road. After 1.5 miles the road drops into the Little Colorado River Canyon corridor. While walking the trails, keep a look out for numerous petroglyphs carved into the rocks.
MORE INFO


White Mountain Grasslands Wildlife Area

This is a fairly new wildlife area founded in 1999, with land added in 2000. As the name suggests, this area is maintained for its grasslands habitat, but it also has riparian habitat. Some species found here are the mountain plover, southwestern willow flycatcher, bald eagle, and Mexican spotted owl, and is an area conducive to introducing the Little Colorado River spinedace. Many other species inhabit the area including a family of antelope. The White Mountains Grasslands Wildlife Area provides restrooms and picnic tables. It is open year-round from sunrise to sunset. To reach the area from Springerville or Eagar, travel west on State Highway 260 about 5 miles to the junction of the road to the Springerville transfer station. Follow the paved road north, then west .6 mile to the southwest corner of the first hill. As soon as the road turns north again, take the dirt road to the left three miles, in a northwest track, to a cattle guard and continue a small distance to the parking area.

MORE INFO

Awesome Things To Do
In The White Mountains
Of Eastern Arizona

Kids Canoeing In White Mountains AZ

Day Tours

DAY TOURS:

Consider making Springerville-Eagar your headquarters for day trips to the Petrified Forest, Big Lake, Luna New Mexico, Volcanic Field Tour, Casa Malpaís National Park, Zuni, Sunrise Ski Resort, or any of our hiking, biking, ATV, or horse trails.


Springerville Volcanic Fields (image)Volcanic Field Tour Day Trip

Areas of a large number of volcanoes are called volcanic fields by geologists and large volcanic fields with hundreds of volcanoes are quite rare and unusual. The Springerville Field contains 405 vents, and covers about 1,158 square miles (that is larger than the state of Rhode Island)! The field extends from just east of Springerville to Show Low and from Greer to just south of St. Johns. The large area covered by this volcanic field is also very unusual. There are very few other places in the world where you can drive at interstate highway speeds for one hour (such as between Springerville and Show Low) and still be in the same volcanic field.


Petrified Forest National Park of Arizona (image)Petrified Forest National Monument

A little more than an hour from the Springerville Heritage Center lies the Petrified Forest, and it is more spectacular than ever. While the park’s wonders haven’t changed much in thousands of years, how you experience this unique environment has. There are backcountry hikes into areas closed to visitors until recently—such as Red Basin and little known areas such as Martha’s Butte. There are also new exhibits to bring the stories to life. Come discover—or rediscover—the Petrified Forest! VISIT THEIR WEBSITE

Winter Recreation

WINTER RECREATION:

All traditional snow sports can be enjoyed right here in Arizona’s winter  wonderland. Cross-country and downhill skiing, snowboarding, snowshoeing, snowcatting, snowmobiling, sledding, ice skating, tubing, ice fishing, and even old fashioned sleigh rides.

Try these popular spots: 


Sunrise Park Resort logo (image)Sunrise Ski Resort

  • Downhill skiing (11 lifts, 65 runs)
  • Cross-country skiing
  • Sledding
  • Snowmobiling,
  • Accommodations and rentals are available

VISIT THEIR WEBSITE


Sledding in Apache County (image)Williams Valley Winter Recreation Area

  • Cross-country skiing
  • Sledding
  • Snowmobiling

VIEW MAP


Apache County Pole Knoll Cross-Country Ski Trail (image)Pole Knoll & Greer Trails

  • Cross-country skiing

VIEW MAP


Hannagan Meadow Lodge logo (image)Hannagan Meadow Winter Recreation Area

  • Cross-country skiing
  • Snowmobiling

VIEW MAP


Squirrel Springs Wilderness Area (image)Squirrel Springs Recreation Area

  • Cross-country skiing
  • Mountain Biking
  • Sledding
  • Wilderness area

VIEW MAP


Rent or buy it - our chamber can help you find it.

Contact THE SWEAT SHOP for your ski, snowboard, and tube rentals. Snow sleds are available at Western Drug and Davis Ace Hardware.

Bird Watching

Birding in the White Mountains of Eastern Arizona:

There is no end to the activities in the White Mountains during the summer months. Hiking, camping, fishing, exploring, and deck-chair lounging are popular—and the list goes on. Now there is something new! The White Mountains are slowly becoming known as a birding destination. The prime season for birding is June through September. June and July are the breeding months and the birds are more vocal and easier to spot. August and September is when you can catch glimpses of migratory birds, as well as local varieties.

 

Expert birders were kind enough to share with us some of the species and their locations. On this page are: dusky grouse, pinyon jays, Lewis’s woodpecker, American three-toed woodpecker, gray jay, Clarks nutcrackers, and American dippers, to name a few.

For Grouse, look in knolls such as Green’s Peak and Big Lake Lookout; all around Nutrioso for Lewis’s woodpecker, and the west fork of the Little Colorado in Greer is a good place to find Dippers. The south fork, Sunrise Lake and campground, Grasslands Wildlife Area, Becker Lake, Luna Lake in Alpine, Terry Flats on Escudilla Mountain, Sipes Wildlife Area, and Wenema Riparian Area have other species and are within easy driving distance of Springerville-Eagar.

Casa Malpais Archaeological Park & Museum

Casa Malpais Archaeological Park & Museum:

Situated beneath the rim of a shield volcano that erupted more than 800,000 years ago, Casa Malpaís is one of the latest occupied pueblos of its time period. Built on volcanic fissures on a terraced site overlooking the Little Colorado River near Springerville, Arizona, this pueblo features a rock calendar, a Great Kiva, and a large masonry pueblo, built out of basalt cobbles. It is commonly thought to be a regional trading center, as well as a regional ceremonial center, inhabited for approximately 100 years around the time period of 1250 to 1340 CE. By the time Coronado came through the area looking for the famed cities of Cibola in 1540, there were no permanent residents in the area.

Starting with the first white man to visit the site, Frank Hamilton Cushing, in 1883, the site has held the interest of the archaeological community ever since. Brought here by the Zuni in New Mexico, Cushing was the first to diagram the pueblo site, and nicknamed it Fissure Pueblo. Followed by several more expeditions, and finally a concerted effort by archaeological organizations, the town of Springerville, the Hopi tribe, and the Pueblo of Zuni to thoroughly document excavation and preservation of sites, Casa Malpaís continues today to be a source of learning about this pre-historic time period in the Round Valley area.

Today, Casa Malpaís remains a destination for travelers interested in archaeological sites and history. In 1964, the site was made a National Historic Monument. Prehistoric sites are numerous in the area, and many people plan their trips around these sites. Along with the museum filled with artifacts from the excavation of Casa Malpaís, and a well-produced video giving the history of the site, it has become a popular destination for national as well as international travelers.

Located at the Springerville Heritage Center
418 E. Main Street
Springerville, AZ 85938

Tours start from the Museum (418 E. Main St.)
March through November, Tuesday – Saturday
Tour times: 9 and 1, weather permitting
Reservations suggested.

VISIT WEBSITE

Pets are not allowed at the cultural site.

Contact Us

Springerville-Eagar Regional Chamber of Commerce

7 W. Main St.
Springerville, AZ 85938
928-333-2123
serccinfo@gmail.com

Museums

Renee Cushman portrait, Renee Cushman Art Museum (image)Renee Cushman Art Collection

Springerville, a town located in a scenic four-seasons area of eastern Arizona, would seem an unlikely place to find an outstanding collection of European art, but so it is. Visitors will be surprised to discover this museum contains an engraving attributed to Rembrandt, three pen-and-ink drawings by Tiepolo, and dozens of other pieces of art and furniture dating from the Renaissance to the early twentieth century.

This remarkable collection was a gift to the area from Mrs. Renee Scharf Cushman, who had lived in the area for only a few years during and after World War II. Only upon her death in 1969, when she willed this valuable collection to the local Latter-Day Saints congregation, did anyone begin to realize how much she had loved the land and respected the people.

In 2012, after over 40 years of honoring, arranging tours, and caring for this collection, the Springerville and Eagar Third Wards passed the Renee Cushman Art Museum on to the Town of Springerville, to allow a greater exposure to the Collection.

Located within the Springerville Heritage Center
418 E. Main Street, Springerville, AZ

Self-Guided Tours
Open Monday – Saturday
(928) 333-2123

VIEW MAP


Butterfly Lodge Museum (image)Butterfly Lodge Museum

Butterfly Lodge was built in Greer in 1914. Oyis Blackfoot was inspired by the countless butterflies in the nearby meadows. It was the mountain residence and hunting lodge belonging to James Willard Schultz (1859 –1947) and his son, Hart Merriam Schultz, known as Lone Wolf (1882 –1970). The lodge housed two colorful careers: the father’s fashioned in words, the son’s through painted images and sculptures of the west. They were two free spirits who found inspiration in this little cabin in the high mountains of Greer.

Butterfly Lodge was opened to the public as Greer’s first museum in 1995, a living memorial to the life and times of James Willard Schultz and Lone Wolf.

Open:
Memorial Day – Labor Day
Thursday – Sunday, 10am to 5pm
Admission: $2 Adult, $1 Youth (12 – 17), children are free

(928) 735-7514
PO Box 76, Greer, AZ 85925

VISIT THEIR WEBSITE


Casa Malpaís Museum (image)Casa Malpais Archaeological Park & Museum

Located at the Springerville Heritage Center, 418 E. Main, the Casa Malpaís Museum houses many artifacts from the archaeological site located north of town. These artifacts date from around 1200 CE. Tours of the site originate from here Tuesday through Saturday, weather permitting. A well-produced video of the site provides the history, is shown 20 minutes prior tour times, and is available upon request for all.

418 E. Main Street
Springerville, AZ 85938
Museum Open: Monday – Saturday, 8 AM – 4 PM
Tours start from the Museum (418 E. Main St)
March – November, Tuesday – Saturday
Tour times: 9, 11:30, and 2, weather permitting
Reservations suggested: (928) 333-5375

VISIT THEIR WEBSITE


Little House Museum (image)Little House Museum

Take a step back in time. This is a truly unique museum with antiques and artifacts from the old west. Old buildings have been authentically restored to their original condition. Around every corner you’ll see turn-of-the-century vintage fashions.

Located on the X Diamond & MLY Ranch west of Springerville, the two-story Little House Museum features exhibits on ranching and pioneer life.

Three miles south of Route 260 on south Fork Road
Springerville, AZ 85938

(928) 333-2286

Outdoor Recreation

Nature Acivities

  • 40 area lakes provide amazing views of a variety of birds, wildlife, and terrain
  • Bird watching—Becker Lake, Canero Lake, Luna Lake, Nelson Reservoir, Mexican Hay Lake, and Greer Lakes are especially good
  • Wilderness Areas—Mount Baldy, Escudilla and Bear Wallow Wilderness, and the Blue Primitive Area plus Sipe Wildlife Area, Becker Wildlife Walk, and Grasslands Wildlife Area
  • Mushrooms, wild grape, berry, and piñon gathering.
  • Wildflowers
  • Stargazing—no city lights!
  • Elk bugling
  • Fall foliage tours
  • USFS Interpretive Tours and Presentations
  • Big Lake Nature Trail
  • Butler Canyon Nature Trail
  • Squirrel Springs Recreation Area, Greer
  • Downhill skiing, snow boarding, tubing, and cross-country skiing in winter at Sunrise Ski Resort
  • Summer activities at Sunrise Ski Park, including zipline and mountain biking.

Water Sports

Lyman Lake is the one area where power boats are permitted. All other lakes are restricted to small motors or electric motors only.

  • Water skiing; public slalom course at Lyman
  • Paddle boats; rentals at several locations
  • Wind surfing
  • Jet skiing
  • Swimming at Lyman Lake
  • Fishing at all lakes
  • Sailing at Lyman and Sunrise Lakes

OHV Trails - Saffell Canyon

CANYON OHV TRAIL includes some of the most-spectacular views in the White Mountains of Arizona. The trail begins at an elevation of 7,600 feet at Saffel Canyon and climbs to 9,400 feet at Pat Knoll. The trail winds through three distinct vegetation zones: piñon-juniper, ponderosa pine, and mixed conifer.

Trail access is 1 mile south of Eagar. From the Eagar stoplight, travel south on Main Street to Schoolbus Road (road takes a 90 degree turn to the west); turn left (south) on Water Canyon Road (FR 285); and follow for 1.8 miles. Turn left (east) on FR 74 for .9 miles; turn right (south) on FR 74D. The trailhead is on the right.

Maps available at the Chamber Office (418 E. Main in Springerville) and at forest service locations in Springerville and Alpine.

VIEW MAP


Camping

The Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest and the White Mountain Apache Reservation offer many beautiful individual and group sites within 10-30 minutes drive of the communities. Opportunities for both tent and rv camping abound throughout the area. Hunters, fishermen, hikers and other outdoor enthusiasts can find camping accommodations to fit any personal preferences.


Hiking, Backpacking, and Mountain Biking

The White Mountains of eastern Arizona offer endless hiking opportunities. Whether you're looking for an quick, easy nature trek, a challenging alpine excursion, or just about anything in between you're sure to get your hiking fix in t Trail maps and information are available from the Springerville-Eagar Regional Chamber of Commerce, the ALPINE RANGER STATION and the RANGER STATION

 


Fishing

WHERE TO FISH IN ARIZONA

VIEW SUMMER TROUT STOCKING SCHEDULE & FISHING LOCATIONS

Summary Wallow Fire-White Mountains Fishing
Wallow Fire Impacts on Specific Trout Populations
Region 1 Stocking Schedule


Hunting

The area is long famed for its hunting, and notables such as Zane Grey, Teddy Roosevelt who loved to hunt here. The area permits bow, black powder, and rifle hunting, and guides and outfitters are available.

Contact the ARIZONA GAME & FISH DEPT. for hunting seasons and permit information.

Springerville Heritage Center

Dinosaur Exploration Center:

Springerville Heritage Center logo (image)Citizen Science from Arizona’s White Mountains

Ten years in the making, the Springerville Heritage Center offers visitors and community members opportunities to learn about history, art, and the area. This is the place to start your trip, with the visitor’s center where tourist information is readily available.

Four museums from around the communities of Round Valley have been relocated into the historic school building at 418 East Main Street in Springerville:

The Renee Cushman Museum, the Becker Family History Museum, Casa Malpaís, and the White Mountain Historical Society. the Springerville-Eagar Chamber of Commerce has been relocated to the front of the Town of Springerville Complex, and a new art gallery has been added in the expanded space.

Local artists from the Greater Round Valley Fine Arts Association display their work in the 150-ft. main hallway and include works from photographers, oil and watercolor painters, quilters, needle-pointers, and more!

Settling in the area after leaving France, Renee Cushman lived out her dream of becoming a rancher here in the 1940s.

The Becker’s were one of the first families to settle our area, and influenced much of the history politically and as merchants.

418 E Main St
Springerville, Arizona
(928) 333-2656 Ext 230

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The Coronado Trail

The History of the Coronado Trail

The legend of the Seven Cities of Gold (Cibola) existed long before Francisco Vasquez de Coronado. Mapmakers had actually been including their idea of where this area was for several hundred years before the Coronado expedition in 1540. The mystique was enough to excite and challenge explorers to competitively seek out the mystical Seven Cities in the New World.

After Columbus’s voyage in 1492, explorers soon settled in islands around what is now Florida, preparing for their journeys. As it happened, the Mayans and Aztecs of what is now Mexico proved to have great wealth and the Spanish found much to convince them that they were on the right track.

Coronado, funded in part by his family and part by Spain, set out on his journey to claim his riches in 1540 – 1542. It was a journey that would take him into what is now Arizona and New Mexico.

In part, Coronado relied on information from a fellow Spaniard, Fray Marcos, who claimed to have seen for himself the golden cities when he made the trek as far north as the Zuni villages near today’s Arizona-New Mexico border in 1538. With a force of 300 Spaniards and 800 Indians, Coronado traveled northward from Mexico, crossing into Arizona at what is now the town of Lochiel, AZ. It is written he traveled to some ruins in southeast Arizona (no longer in existence), where he turned northward, crossing the Gila River somewhere near Safford, between the modern towns of Duncan and Bylas.

Although we’d like to think Coronado traveled north through Arizona’s White Mountains to what is now Springerville, it may be more likely he followed the road system early native inhabitants of the area had developed, taking him on a parallel, but somewhat easier course to what is now given the name of Coronado Scenic Highway.

It is claimed Coronado’s expedition traveled as far north in Arizona as the town of St Johns, before turning toward their destination of Cibola, or, what is known today as Zuni, New Mexico.

Instead of the great city Fray Marcus had reported, Cibola turned out to be a poor village of not more than 200 inhabitants. As they would be satisfied only with immediate gold and riches, they did not recognize the potential in the fertile valley through which they passed, nor could they see the value deep in the hills—the copper, silver, and gold they so desired. Thus, the expedition was deemed a failure.

Fast forward to 1926, when the US Highway 666 (now Hwy 191), between Springerville and Morenci was completed and designated a National Scenic Byway; one of 30 in the nation. At the dedication, Governor W.P. Hunt referred to the highway as the Coronado Scenic Byway, as it approximated the path taken by Coronado not quite 400 years earlier.

Arizona Coronado Trail map (image)

Wildlife Areas

Sipe White Mountain Wildlife Area map (image)

Sipe White Mountain Wildlife Area

A few miles southeast of Springerville and Eagar on Highway 180/191, in the shadows of Escudilla Mountain, lies Sipe White Mountain Wildlife Area. Recreational opportunities include wildlife viewing and photography, picnicking, and hiking to historic and prehistoric cultural sites. A small visitor center is located on site. Visitors are encouraged to look through the visitor center first and then explore the grounds to enhance their wildlife viewing experience. Move about the property freely by hiking, biking, or horseback riding on one of four trails leading to wetlands, meadows, and old homesteads. Several wildlife viewing points are located along the trails. Visit the last weekend in July for the annual Hummingbird band, High Country Hummers.


Becker Lake White Mountains Wildlife Area map (image)

Becker Lake Wildlife Area

The wildlife area has two hiking trails. The Lakeview Trail is a one-mile loop following the western edge of Becker Lake to an observation platform overlooking the southern, marshy end of the lake. Here, waterfowl and shorebirds can easily be seen, especially during migration. The River Walk Trail meanders along the Little Colorado River for a half-mile where mule deer and beaver are readily found. Lakeview Trail access is two miles west of the traffic light in Springerville on Highway 60. Turn south into the main Becker Lake area, designated with signage. The River Walk Trail is one mile west of the light in Springerville on Highway 60. Turn south into the parking area just before crossing the bridge over the Little Colorado River.

In December, the River Walk is turned into the Festival of Lights, decorated with more than 30,000 lights for the holidays.


Weinema Wildlife Area

This corridor of river riparian habitat stretches more than two miles along the Little Colorado River. Two hiking trails provide easy access to both stream-side and upland areas where you can view beaver, mule deer, chipmunks, numerous waterfowl, birds, and raptors. At the junction of US Hwys 60 and 191/180, go a quarter mile north on Hwy 191/180 and turn right onto a graded, dirt road. After 1.5 miles the road drops into the Little Colorado River Canyon corridor. While walking the trails, keep a look out for numerous petroglyphs carved into the rocks.


White Mountain Grasslands Wildlife Area

This is a fairly new wildlife area founded in 1999, with land added in 2000. As the name suggests, this area is maintained for its grasslands habitat, but it also has riparian habitat. Some species found here are the mountain plover, southwestern willow flycatcher, bald eagle, and Mexican spotted owl, and is an area conducive to introducing the Little Colorado River spinedace. Many other species inhabit the area including a family of antelope. The White Mountains Grasslands Wildlife Area provides restrooms and picnic tables. It is open year-round from sunrise to sunset. To reach the area from Springerville or Eagar, travel west on State Highway 260 about 5 miles to the junction of the road to the Springerville transfer station. Follow the paved road north, then west .6 mile to the southwest corner of the first hill. As soon as the road turns north again, take the dirt road to the left three miles, in a northwest track, to a cattle guard and continue a small distance to the parking area.

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